The open source powerdelivery project for doing continuous delivery I’ve blogged about does a lot of things in a small package, so it’s natural to want to understand why you would bother to use it if perhaps you like the concepts of continuous delivery but you’ve been using off the shelf Microsoft Team Foundation Server (TFS) builds and figure they are good enough. Here’s just a few reasons to consider it for streamlining your releases.

You can build locally

TFS lets you create custom builds, but you can’t run them locally. Since powerdelivery is a PowerShell script, as long as you fill out values for your “Local” environment configuration file you can build on your own computer. This is great for single computer deployments, demoing or working offline.

You can prevent untested changes from being deployed

You have to use the build number of a successful commit build as input to a test build, and the same goes for moving builds from test to production. This prevents deployment of the latest changes to test or production with an unintended change since the last time you tested and when you actually deploy to production.

You can add custom build tasks without compiling

To customize vanilla TFS builds, you need to use Windows Workflow Foundation (WWF *snicker*) and MSBuild. If you want to do anything in these builds that isn’t part of one of the built in WWF activities or MSBuild tasks, your stuck writing custom .dlls that must be compiled, checked back into TFS, and referenced by your build each time they change. Since powerdelivery just uses a script, just edit the script and check it in, and your Commit build starts automatically.

You only need one build script for all your environments

You can use the vanilla technologies mentioned above to create builds targeting multiple environments, but you will have to create a custom solution. Powerdelivery does this for you out of the box.

You can reduce your deployment time by compiling only in commit (development)

The Commit function is only called in Local and Commit builds, so you can perform long-running compilation activities only once and benefit from speedy deployments to your test and production environment.

Category:
configuration, deployment, environment, process improvement, productivity, testing

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